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Author Topic: Intestines "All Bunched Up"????  (Read 4759 times)
Ashford

Posts: 200


« on: July 02, 2008, 04:25:09 PM »

My sister's domestic short hair, Fancy is not eating, threw up three times in the past three days, has a fever of 103.  Took her to the vet yesterday and the took  xrays which revealed that her intestines are bunched up is how they described it.  They showed me the xray on a large screen but I didn't know what I was looking at.

Has anyone ever hear of this before???  I asked the vet what causes it and she said that it could be something she ate or perhaps there is just a "big doodoo in there waiting to come out".  She isn't any better today so I am taking her back in about an hour and they are going to give her an enema I  believe to try and flush it out.

Gotta run
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"Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" - Theophile Gautier
Azurine101

Posts: 5540


« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 04:32:26 PM »

Hi Judy,
 I have heard of this in dogs and cats. Sometimes it can be something they eat and it can twist the bowel. I would assume the vet ruled this out before giving an enema.  Sometimes they can take a fall and it messes up the bowels.. many times a enema can straighten them back out , if it is stool it will move it out. The fever is puzzeling as that usually goes along with an infection. Saying some prayers all works out well. keep us posted Pat
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dlucy44
phpBB Virtual Persian Guide

Posts: 4220


« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 04:32:57 PM »

:? I have never heard of intestines being "all bunched up", maybe a hairball.....or something.  :?  Please send Fancy our best wishes and keep us posted.   :flower:  :paw:
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Lucy and Coco
"There is no wealth like knowledge,
no poverty like ignorance."

JulieAnn

Posts: 1491


« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2008, 04:39:43 PM »

We're praying & purring for your baby - may everything come out well!
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Ceylon

Posts: 1502


« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2008, 04:45:08 PM »

My goodness! The poor girl. I hope she gets better quickly and this doesn't happen to her again.
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Those who speak the loudest
about the faults of others are often lacking integrity themselves.
LynMarie

Posts: 3298


« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2008, 05:27:59 PM »

I had a Springer Spanial that had a bowel that turned on itself.
It was late when the vet saw it and she sent me to the emergency clinic to have the night vet do the surgery and he refused saying she should have stayed late and done it.  Cost me 1000.00 dollars and the dog died a painfull death with out the surgery.
P***es me off still,
LynMarie
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'The  most terrifying words in the English language are: I'm from the government  and I'm here to help.' -  Ronald Reagan
Ashford

Posts: 200


« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2008, 11:00:59 PM »

Wow, LynMarie, I can understand how you feel.  Ridiculous.  Poor dog.


Back from the vet.  They ran all kinds of tests.  I was wrong in that they did not give Fancy an enema.  I misunderstood.  They gave her barium so that they could get a better look at her intestines and colon.  So far they haven't found any obstructions in her intestines and we are hoping that she'll eat and will also hold down her food.  She is normally a glutton but now just is not interested in food at all.  So far it's cost my sister almost $700.  

They also ran blood tests and found nothing.  No feline AIDS of lukemia, thank God.  I asked for sub Q fluids again to help her feel better because she's not drinking water at all either.

I suspect Fancy hurt herself falling off a desk on to a potted plant (fake) and an armchair while chasing after a bug that was outside the window on the porch.

Wish us luck and please keep the prayers coming.

Many thanks,
Judy
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"Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" - Theophile Gautier
LynMarie

Posts: 3298


« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2008, 12:26:07 AM »

They had something on tv a couple of weeks ago about mice eating 20% more food when they yougert they were fed had spertame in it.
Seams the body guess how much insulin to put out by how sweet our food is and the artifical sweetener drops the sugar level low enough that it trigers more eating.

May be some artificial sweetened yougert to get her bloodsuger to chime the hunger bell.

Just a hope.
LynMarie
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'The  most terrifying words in the English language are: I'm from the government  and I'm here to help.' -  Ronald Reagan
Dakota

Posts: 801


« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2008, 06:41:56 AM »

Ashford, just saw this post. Dakota was 6 months when I got him and he threw up everyday. After trying many things we went to the vet and the ultra sound and xrays showed his intestions bunched up in back and they were very worried. After many,many different types of meds and tests, enamas, he finally seemed to come around. One thing was that he never ate wet food and was probably never groomed. He was full of  hairballs. When he did start eating it,plus catlax,ect. we had him xrayed again and things seem to be much better. He has a large cyst on one kidney, but this did not seem to create the intestine problem.
 
Hope all goes well for this little cat. It's hard to deal with a problem like this in cats. :?
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"There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats."
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Mel

Posts: 2050


« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2008, 09:01:49 AM »

Oh Judy, I'm sorry to hear this about Fancy. I hope she recovers well. As it would turn out for me, I have to bring Brandy, my senior Himmie to the vet today for an enema. Poor little isn't eliminating and I've tried everything I could so far. I hope Fancy gets better soon.
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Ashford

Posts: 200


« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2008, 11:52:27 AM »

Thank you all so much for sharing your experiences and for the advice.  

Fancy ate a little Fancy Feast Chicken which she normally likes.  Last night my sister, against doctor's orders gave her dry kibble mixed with Fancy Feast fish which she eats daily and she ate a little of it.  This morning I gave her some hairball remedy and hopefully it will help her to poop.  She hasn't gone for about three days now.  Of course she hasn't been eating either.  Poor girl is still not feeling well and my sister is refusing to spend any more money at the vet.  I can understand as $700 that she could ill afford just flew out the window and hasn't helped diagnose what's wrong nor has it helped Fancy to feel much better.  

At this point, only the grace of God will get her well.

Aloha,
Judy
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"Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" - Theophile Gautier
JulieAnn

Posts: 1491


« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2008, 12:50:48 PM »

I feel your vet is a greedy failure...perhaps this article below will help.  You can't leave the feces - it must come out!

After reading the following, I'd be tempted to get those Baby Glycerin suppositories, and use it!

"Constipation and Your Cat
Constipation is relatively common in cats (normal feline colon). While middle-aged and older cats (cats over 8 years) are more susceptible, cats of any age can become constipated. Although there is no absolute rule on the number of bowel movements a cat should have each day, most healthy adult cats have one or two. Veterinarians suspect constipation when a cat has no (or very infrequent) bowel movements, when it strains while attempting to defecate, and when it has a significantly decreased amount of stool.(image enlarged megacolon)

Constipation, in and of itself, is not a disease. It is, however, a sign that all is not well within the cat's gastrointestinal tract. And if not attended to promptly, constipation can become a debilitating and serious condition. If you suspect your cat has not had a bowel movement for several days, it's time to consult your veterinarian.

Often owners don't realize anything is amiss until constipation is considerably advanced - with obvious signs of distress such as frequent trips to the litter box, straining to defecate (tenesmus), and painful defecation (dyschezia). Behaviors include crying and licking the genital- anal area., These signs, too, can be misleading. When a client calls our office and states that my cat's been in and out of the box three or four times in the last hour, the client is always assuming it's constipation, whereas 90 percent of the time it's a urinary obstruction , especially if it's a male cat. And a urinary obstruction, unlike constipation, is an emergency.

As constipation progresses, the signs become more pronounced. The cat may lose its appetite, become lethargic, look unkempt, begin to crouch and hunch up because of abdominal discomfort, and possibly even vomit. Contrary to what you would expect, the cat may even pass a small amount of runny, blood-tinged diarrhea.

We tend to use the term constipation generically to describe not one but three distinct condition: constipation, obstipation, and megacolon. And although the three conditions have much in common, they also have significant differences. So veterinarians treat them differently.

Constipation and obstipation are the most closely related conditions and can be viewed as different points on a continuum. Constipation is the stage when the cat has obvious difficulty passing a stool. Obstipation is when the cat is very blocked (severely impacted) and unable to have any bowel movement at all. The causes of constipation and obstipation are many, including diet (ingested hair, foreign bodies, bones); environment (a dirty litter box, lack of exercise, hospitalization); painful defecation (anal abscesses from cat-fight bites or feces- matted hair [long-haired cats are particularly susceptible]); obstructions (tumors and improperly healed pelvic fractures that restrict movement through the intestines); and medications (for other conditions). And watch your cat's weight. Obese cats can become constipated.

Chronic constipation and obstipation from specific causes can result in a distended colon that has poor movement (megacolon). Sometimes, though, megacolon. occurs when the muscular movement of the colon wall, which propels fecal material through the colon, diminishes for some unknown reason. As a result, fecal matter comes remains in the colon where it becomes drier and harder. Over time, the enlarged, impacted colon loses most of its muscular ability (motility) and becomes a loose pouch filled with dry, concrete like material. Unfortunately, veterinary science has yet to discover the causes of this condition known as idiopathic megacolon.

Treatment for constipation is two pronged: first, relieve the constipation from recurring either by removing the cause of the constipation or by medically managing the cat. Relief for the constipated cat can occur naturally through induced defecation with enemas and glycerin infused into the colon, or, if the cat is severely impacted, through manual removal of the hardened feces under anesthesia.

Any cat that has been constipated for several days may also be very dehydrated. So before staring any procedure, your veterinarian may give your cat subcutaneous or intravenous replacement fluids. Rehydration with intravenous fluid may also be necessary to help renurish the colon with electrolytes and fluids.

Removing the stool of a severely impacted cat takes time and patience. Once a cat has been cleaned out, most veterinarians immediately put the cat on a program of medical management.

Medical management for cats with chronic constipation typically has both a dietary and medical component. The dietary component usually involves putting the cat on a higher fiber diet. Fiber absorbs water thereby creating looser, bulkier stools. That shortens the transit time in the gastrointestinal tract and keeps things moving. While you want to increase the amount of fiber in your cat's diet, you don't want to overdo it. Initially, don't be tempted to switch to the highest-fiber diet you can find. And you should introduce the dietary change gradually, over five to seven days. If you switch your cat too quickly onto a high-fiber diet, your poor feline chum will likely become very uncomfortable with gas pains.

Sources of supplementary fiber include bran, psyllium (Metamucil), and canned pumpkin. Some cats will eat these products, others won't. If your cat will eat them, mix the fiber-rich supplement in with quality canned cat food. However, before you implement any dietary changes, consult your veterinarian to make sure the changes you propose meet your cat's dietary and health needs. (Increased dietary fiber doesn't help every cat.)

Another newer approach along with the above has met with some success. This includes use of two prescription medications lactulose, a medications that softens the stool, and propulcid, a motility modifier. Another medication now used is ranitidine, again with some success.

We, in our practice, have also begun to use acupuncture to treat this disease. This procedure has only been performed in two cases at this time (2-00) and has been successful.

Water consumption is also very important, for the constipation-prone cat. Find out what your cat's water preferences are and accommodate them. Know that canned food has a higher water content than dried food and that milk an have a laxative effect in some (but not all) cats.

If medical management is ineffective, there is another approach-surgery.

Surgery for the treatment of megacolon is a highly successful surgery that returns most cats to a normal life-style. This major surgery is a subtotal colectomy. This involves the removal of most of the colon, then reconnects the remaining ends, allowing the cat to defecate normally. The downside to the surgery is the very small risk of leakage at the point where the ends are rejoined, which can result in life- threatening infection within the abdominal cavity. (Should this occur, your veterinarian can do corrective surgery and treat the infection.) As with any major abdominal surgery, there is always the small risk of other complications. But for most cats, the outcome is very successful.

Finally, how concerned should owners be about constipation? Owners whose cats have a single bout probably do not have to worry. For chronically constipated cats, this condition will require constant attention."
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whispersdream

Posts: 1474


« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2008, 03:44:01 PM »

oh dear I hope fancy gets cleared up & well soon! It must suck to be feeling like that! Sending prayers & hugsssss
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chatcat723

Posts: 561


« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2008, 05:03:27 PM »

I had a serious issue with Mandu a few years ago.  He got very very sick and the end result was a part of his intestine was pulled inside and died; it's called intussusception.  He had surgery (to the tune of $1800) and is now doing well...IBS but not often anymore.  We nearly lost him and I thank God every day he's still with me.  His brother wouldn't go near him as he had the smell of death on him.  I had to put another litter box out in another part of the house for him to use...he didn't come near Mandu for about 2 weeks after.
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Mommie Cat and the Twins
Ashford

Posts: 200


« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2008, 02:30:50 AM »

I don't think that constipation was the originating problem as Fancy had a big (her usual) bowel movement the day before she showed signs of illness.  She hasn't been eating and we think that may be why no elimination.  We both gave her at different times today some hairball remedy and it is a laxative.  She is eating very small amounts and is still not feeling well although she is a wee bit better.  She is showing a little more interest in food as she is at the moment sitting on  the floor below the kitchen sink while my sister prepares a little food for her.  She just took a few bites and already walked away from the food.  My sister is not a very caring person and does not have patience.   grrrrrrrrrr

Judy
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"Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" - Theophile Gautier
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